The seduction of a young woman in andrew marvells poem to his coy mistress

This seduction poem is presented in the unromantic form of a logical syllogism. Marvell, who never married, is not trying to emulate John Donne of the early "Jack the rake period.

However, this argument would be less than flattering; for his haste seems to be born more of a physical desire rather than a deep and abiding love—of which many women would rather hear than of a sweetheart's impatience. This segment of the syllogism is memorably summarized by its ironic concluding couplet.

To His Coy Mistress

In the Atlantic ocean, a group of people aboard a boat, and clearly in exile from their native land, spy the Bermudas, and sing a song in praise of the island. And the conclusion is drawn from the first two stanzas.

By the end, it makes a brief comparison between the mistress in this poem, and the images of females in previous ages. Andrew Marvell the poet is writing a poem about the act of making a garland, both acts of creativity, both designed to glorify God.

But such a plan is a fantasy, because in reality, our time on Earth is short. Once life is over, the speaker contends, the opportunity to enjoy one another is gone, as no one embraces in death.

Analysis of Poem

It manages to carry along on simple rhyming couplets the complex passions of a male speaker, hungry for sexual liason with a lady, before all devouring time swallows them up. Her skin has a morning glow.

There then follows a series of potential scenarios laid out by the speaker to illustrate exactly what he means. In spending so many lines on these specific spots that he would worship for many years—if time allowed—his arguments to "make much of time" echo Robert Herrick's " To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time " and concentrate more on the flesh and less on the spiritual and the emotional.

Hope 's "His Coy Mistress to Mr. Plus the more the terminology becomes tough, although being adorned with sensitive words. In the real world the lover and the lady-love are placed in a transient or they could surely be devoured by time and the lady-love would grow and die.

My vegetable love would grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart.

Next comes an anti-Petrarchan segue. There is none of the dalliance or playing-hard-to-get that we usually assume with coyness. It focuses on the lustful desires of a man attempting to entice a female virgin, the mistress, into sexual intimacy.

I would Love you ten years before the Flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews. Critical reception and themes[ edit ] Until recently, "To His Coy Mistress" had been received by many as a poem that follows the traditional conventions of carpe diem love poetry.

Andy Marvell, What a Marvel'. And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity.

Andrew Marvell

In the second part of the poem, there is a sudden transition into imagery that involves graves, marble vaults and worms. The speaker's use of hyperbole definitely makes his point.

She is within full of desire of love-making. These images are suggestive to signify the quick and violent love-making. I would Love you ten years before the flood, And you should, if you please, refuse Till the conversion of the Jews.

Rather than the vast separation of the Ganges from the Humber, let us not merely unite but. Marvell’s poem, “To His Coy Mistress”, talks about a very secular thing, coitus, in a much elaborated language and conceit, which is the emblem of Metaphysical poets.

Throughout the poem the speaker, who seems to be a young man, is using the language as a.

To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell

As well as being a seduction lyric, ‘To His Coy Mistress’ is also a carpe diem poem, which argues that we should ‘seize the day’ because life is short. Marvell, addressing his sweetheart, says that the woman’s reluctance to have sex with him would be fine, if life wasn’t so short.

“To His Coy Mistress” is primarily the author, Andrew Marvell, trying to convince and seduce “his coy mistress”, into having intimate relations with him. Marvell's poem, "To His Coy Mistress", talks about a very secular thing, coitus, in a much elaborated dialect and conceit, which is the emblem of Metaphysical poets.

Throughout the poem the presenter, who appears to be a young man, is using the words as a mean to seduce, first the lady's head, then her body. In "To His Coy Mistress," the speaker attempts to convince his beloved to act on her passion.

He begins by extolling her beauty and declaring that, if he had the time, he would devote himself to. Annie Finch's "Coy Mistress" suggests that poetry is a more fitting use of their time than lovemaking, while A.D.

Hope's "His Coy Mistress to Mr.

To His Coy Mistress Summary

Marvell" turns down the offered seduction outright. Many authors have borrowed the phrase "World enough and time" .

The seduction of a young woman in andrew marvells poem to his coy mistress
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